Guest Room Overdye Rug Review

Yesterday I posted a picture of my guest room rug on Instagram and it generated a lot of interest, so I thought I would pop over here and give a little review.  Overdye rugs have been popular for a few years now, but sometimes I forget that they are still new to some people, or hard to find for others.  The most beautiful ones are vintage handmade silk and wool turkish rugs that have been dyed brilliant colors and are wildly expensive a serious investment.  (See ABC Carpet and Home.)  Others are new, machine made, quite reasonable but definitely not as cute.  That would be my rug.  The 5×8 violet beauty was all of $290.  But don’t get so excited yet- it has its pros and cons- and I’ll quickly break them down below.

 

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The DETAILS:

NuLoom Colour Series Genisa Overdye

(Looks to be sold out, check here or here.)

Machine Made- 100% Polyamide

violet overdy rug detail 2

The PROS

It’s cheap!

Since its machine made, and essentially plastic, its super durable and easy to clean.

You could hose the damn thing off.

It doesn’t shed.

violet overdye rug detail

The CONS

It’s Fake looking!

It’s not woven and you can tell.

The pattern looks printed on up close.

It’s not as soft underfoot… a little plasticy and rough.  Still softer than a flatweave, though.

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Overall, I’m happy with it in my guest room because it is half covered up and adds a nice richness to the room.

It’s not the focal point, it’s just a vibrant accesory.  Plus it helps the space feel warm underfoot.

I wouldn’t like it in my living room where are of the finishes are nicer. It’s fakeness would stick out like a sore thumb.

GOOD FOR:

Playrooms

Guest Rooms

NOT GOOD FOR:

A space where you have already invested in fine pieces or vintage pieces.

(It will bring the whole quality of the room down.)

So basically the rug will be perfect for some, and not right for others.

Hope this little review helps.

Creating a Layered Look with Antiques

Today is my first post as a contributor for Meg Biram‘s fabulous new site!  Please hop over to see me share my favorite ways to add in antiques or vintage pieces into a room design.  I don’t think I realized how often I go vintage in my design work until I compiled the ideas into one post!  For me,  layering in antiques is essential to create a room with depth and soul.  You can just feel it when you walk into a space and its all spanking new… something is just lacking.  

Not wanting you all to live in soulless sterile interiors, I’ve quickly whipped up a few vintage finds to help you get that Design Manifest Layered Look.




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PS- That inlaid elephant table is nearly identical to my own!

Cottage Talk: My Living Room Rugs

Last week I talked about how I plan to keep my living room rug neutral.   It will be a 6 x 9 jute rug with a tan cowhide layered over it.  It just so happens that I have this set up in my current bedroom, so I thought I’d share the look in real life.

I’m also going to have the wood chair in my living room, though I think I’ll recover the seat.  Not that I think zebra is out (it’s a classic,) or zebra and cowhide can’t play together (I love a good menagerie,) it’s just not what I’m feeling for the space.  I want softer.

The rattan coffee table used to be my nightstand in the loft.  It’s a great size for my teeny tiny living room and may live there temporarily until I find something I love.   I like the concept of glass over the rugs, but I’m just not sure yet.  I want the rest of the room to fill in.


PS- the rug was bought forever ago on Overstock.  I hope to upgrade to Merida or Fibreworks at some point.  Jenny wrote a great post on jute rugs here.  The cowhide is from Ebay… I think.

9 Turkish Bathroom Rugs under $200

Call me a one trick pony, but I could and would put an antique Turkish*  rug in every bathroom I design.  I’m most drawn to the ones that are faded with unique colors.  The tufted wool rugs are soft under foot (unlike kilims) and the perfect substitute for a bathmat.  One of these rugs can add SO much personality to a cramped bath.  Saturday morning I sat in bed and scrolled through thousands of potential rugs for my bathroom.  I’m sharing my 10 favorite cast-offs with you below- all sized around 3×5 or smaller.  Scoop them up and toss out those bath mats.



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Come by tomorrow to see the rug I am considering along with the rest of my bathroom fixtures and selections.  My scheme is starting to come together!

* Note not all rugs are Turkish.  Many are Persian or from other areas.  Please read rug descriptions for more information,